Green-hearted sushi in Wasabi Warriors | Lifestyle | GMA News Online

February 13, 2015 5:34 AM

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 Green-hearted sushi in Wasabi Warriors | Lifestyle | GMA News Online

Perhaps the peaceful, efficient manner in which the Australian sushi chain operates has to do with a couple of robots – one that mixes sushi rice and the other that assembles the rolls. Apart from minimizing kitchen stress (and the need for a chef), the robots are also what allow the restaurant to serve the sushi rolls quickly. As anyone who's ever tried to make their own sushi knows, it's no easy feat.

Perhaps the peaceful, efficient manner in which the Australian sushi chain operates has to do with a couple of robots – one that mixes sushi rice and the other that assembles the rolls. Apart from minimizing kitchen stress (and the need for a chef), the robots are also what allow the restaurant to serve the sushi rolls quickly. As anyone who's ever tried to make their own sushi knows, it's no easy feat.

"With this, I can teach anyone in a few hours. You may not be fast, and even I'm not specifically fast. In Australia, some of our girls roll as many as 150 in an hour. And you just couldn't do that by hand," explains head chef Felicity Ball, who trained the Manila team before flying back home.

"With this, I can teach anyone in a few hours. You may not be fast, and even I'm not specifically fast. In Australia, some of our girls roll as many as 150 in an hour. And you just couldn't do that by hand," explains head chef Felicity Ball, who trained the Manila team before flying back home.

The menu is pretty simple: 12 types of sushi, which can all be made using white, brown, black, or red rice. The rolls are served whole, but can also be cut. There are choices for all kinds of eaters, from carnivores to vegans. Although soy sauce is available, mayo is the dressing of choice to avoid staining your clothes or workspace, if you like to multitask while eating. There are also bento boxes and bowls, and snacks such as seaweed salad and edamame.

The menu is pretty simple: 12 types of sushi, which can all be made using white, brown, black, or red rice. The rolls are served whole, but can also be cut. There are choices for all kinds of eaters, from carnivores to vegans. Although soy sauce is available, mayo is the dressing of choice to avoid staining your clothes or workspace, if you like to multitask while eating. There are also bento boxes and bowls, and snacks such as seaweed salad and edamame.

The menu is also budget-friendly. Each roll costs P100 to P150, while the Warrior Packs are P350. The most expensive item is the Nigiri Pack, a tasty snack with an explosion of flavors. Crunchy black sesame seeds, chili powder, Japanese mayo, seaweed flakes, and of course, the creamy salmon.

The menu is also budget-friendly. Each roll costs P100 to P150, while the Warrior Packs are P350. The most expensive item is the Nigiri Pack, a tasty snack with an explosion of flavors. Crunchy black sesame seeds, chili powder, Japanese mayo, seaweed flakes, and of course, the creamy salmon.

The main idea is to serve healthy food fast, which is why Wasabi Warriors branches are set up without a dine-in area, except for the Philippine branch, which considers how Filipinos like to sit down and enjoy their meals.

The main idea is to serve healthy food fast, which is why Wasabi Warriors branches are set up without a dine-in area, except for the Philippine branch, which considers how Filipinos like to sit down and enjoy their meals.

Even more interesting is that Wasabi Warriors isn't just about the food or the dining experience, which is pleasant thanks to high ceilings, warm lighting, and large tables that are good for both big groups or solitary meals.

Even more interesting is that Wasabi Warriors isn't just about the food or the dining experience, which is pleasant thanks to high ceilings, warm lighting, and large tables that are good for both big groups or solitary meals.

As Kimmi Siu Dewar, business manager of Swinging Chairs Establishments Inc. explains, Wasabi Warriors is all about "sushi with a green heart."

"Filipinos are definitely getting smart about what they eat. They want to eat food that comes from a good place," says Dewar at a press conference on January 28. The Australian-born Dewar lived in the Philippines for two years, where she noticed a gap between fast, convenient food that tasted good and was healthy.

The Australian sushi chain tries to do this throughout its operations, from the ingredients to the staff. For the food, they use locally-sourced and sustainable ingredients such as organic vegetables and free range chicken. The menu is the same all over, but most of the ingredients are local, whether you're in Australia, Hong Kong, New Zealand, or the Philippines.

Another environment-conscious aspect is the packaging, which Dewar says is biodegradable. The restaurant is also designed with the environment in mind, using recycled wood and bamboo, as well as a huge fan to minimize the use of air conditioning during the cooler months.

They also try to minimize waste by giving unsold food to charity, while leftovers are composted.

Working with charity organizations, they hire youth who need help getting a job, beginning with five who are part of the pioneer crew.

"We're going to give them opportunities. If they perform well, they will one day be restaurant managers. I believe they can be. It's going back to doing good. When you come here, you know you're not only eating well and feeling well, you're actually helping out in your local community," she says.

Source: gmanetwork.com

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